Interesting Lawsuit

Yesterday One America News posted an article about Whitey Bulger. Whitey Bulger was a well-known figure to anyone who lived near Boston, Massachusetts. He was the boss of Boston’s notorious Winter Hill Gang (aka Irish Mafia).

On March 22, 2018, The New American reported:

Whitey Bulger, as The New American detailed back in 1998 (“FBI Covering for Criminals”), was the murderous boss of Boston’s notorious Winter Hill Gang, also known as the “Irish Mafia.” For two decades (1975-1994) Bulger led a charmed existence, as his brutal gang carried out their crime rampage under the FBI’s protection! Time after time, Massachusetts state and local police had their elaborate, years-long investigations of Bulger foiled by FBI interference. FBI Special Agent John Connolly and John Morris, who was in charge of the FBI’s Boston Organized Crime Squad, were Bulger’s protectors and would tip him off to investigations and wiretaps by other police agencies. This corrupt FBI-Bulger relationship was dramatized in Martin Scorcese’s 2006 film, The Departed, starring Jack Nicholson, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Matt Damon. In 1994, Bulger was tipped off by his FBI handler John Connolly that investigators were closing in on him. He went on the lam and eluded capture for 16 years. He was arrested in California in 2011 and went on trial in 2013, charged with 32 counts of racketeering, including 19 murders. The jury convicted Bulger of 31 of the 32 counts, including 11 of the 19 murders. He was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences plus five years.

Oddly enough, there are some connections between Whitey Bulger and Robert Mueller (as reported in The New American):

In her March 20 blog post. Sarah Carter links to a noteworthy 2011 article by Boston Globe columnist Kevin Cullen entitled, “A lingering question for the FBI Director.” The FBI Director Cullen was referring to was then-Director Robert Mueller, who had previously been one of the DOJ attorneys tasked with overseeing the FBI-Bulger criminal operation. The Cullen article introduces readers to objections raised against Mueller by Mike Albano, a former member of the Massachusetts parole board and the former mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts. He was objecting at the time to the reappointment of Mueller as FBI chief.

While on the parole board, Albano had become convinced that the FBI and DOJ had framed four men with bogus evidence for the 1965 gangland murder of a Boston hoodlum named Teddy Deegan. Albano decided to vote in favor of parole for Peter Limone, one of the four. “So in 1983, after Albano indicated he might vote to release Limone, he got a visit from a pair of FBI agents named John Connolly and John Morris,” Cullen reported. “They told Albano that the men convicted of Deegan’s murder were bad guys, made guys. ‘They told me that if I wanted to stay in public life, I shouldn’t vote to release a guy like Limone,’ Albano said. ‘They intimidated me.’’’

The FBI and DOJ framed the four scapegoats, who were then sent to prison for the Deegan murder to protect Bulger, his henchman Steve “The Rifleman” Flemmi, and Flemmi’s brother, Vincent “Jimmy” Flemmi. “After Albano was elected mayor of Springfield in 1995, he soon found the FBI hot on his tail, investigating his administration for corruption,” Cullen noted. “The FBI took down several people in his administration, and Albano is convinced that the FBI wasn’t interested in public integrity as much as in publicly humiliating him because he dared to defy them.”

In 2001, Albano was vindicated. The four men who had been wrongly convicted in the Deegan murder were exonerated. Two of them had already died in prison. As a result of this shocking government malfeasance, the two surviving victims and the families of the deceased were awarded compensation of $100 million — courtesy of the taxpayers.

“Albano was appalled that, later that same year, Mueller was appointed FBI director, because it was Mueller, first as an assistant U.S. attorney then as the acting U.S. attorney in Boston, who wrote letters to the parole and pardon boards throughout the 1980s opposing clemency for the four men framed by FBI lies,” writes the Boston Globe’s Cullen. “Of course, Mueller was also in that position while Whitey Bulger was helping the FBI cart off his criminal competitors even as he buried bodies in shallow graves along the Neponset.”

Fast forward to today.

One America News reports:

The family of one of America’s most notorious crime bosses is seeking justice for his death in prison. According to reports, the family of James ‘Whitey’ Bulger recently filed a civil lawsuit against the Federal Bureau of Prisons and 30 unnamed employees.

They have alleged the prison system failed to protect Bulger who was killed within 12-hours after transferring to the U.S. Penitentiary Hazelton in West Virginia. Additionally, they argued the prison knew they were putting Bulger in harms way because they failed to take precautions to protect him even though he was well known for being a “snitch.”

“They should get the answers they’ve been looking for,” said Steve Davis, brother of Bulger. “To me, I think it was all premeditated…I think it was all set from his whole move, they just waited for the write time.”

Bulger was one of America’s most wanted criminals for 16 years after fleeing Boston in late 1994. At 81-years-old, he was captured in Santa Monica, California in 2013 and later convicted for participating in 11 murders.

Bulger was sent to federal prisons in Florida and Arizona before being transferred to Hazelton. He was allegedly beaten by a lock-and-sock type weapon. His killer is still not yet known.

Oh the tales that Whitey Bulger could have told…

A Subtle Way To Infringe On A Constitutional Right

“America’s 1st Freedom” is a magazine distributed by the National Rifle Association. I am not including a link to the article I am posting about because I can’t find the article electronically although it is in the April 2020 issue of the magazine.

The title of the article is “The New Gun-Control Activism.” It deals with the strategy those who oppose the right of Americans to own guns are using to limit the availability of guns to Americans.

The article notes:

Last year, for example, Connecticut State Treasurer Shawn Wooden, who commands $37 billion in public pension funds, announced plans to pull $30 million worth of shares from civilian firearm manufacturer securities. Wooden also intends to prohibit similar investments in the future and to establish incentives for banks and financial institutions to adopt anti-gun protocols. The proposition was immediately praised by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and other Connecticut politicians who view the divestment from five companies–Clarus Corp., Daicel Corp., Vista Outdoor Inc., Olin Corp., and ammunition maker Northrop Grumman–as a step toward reducing gun violence.

…Wooden also requested that financial bodies disclose their gun-related portfolios when endeavoring to wok with the treasurer’s office. Wooden subsequently selected tow firms, Citibank and Rick Financial Product (both had expressed the desire to be part of the “solution on gun violence”), to take on the roll of senior bankers in Connecticut’s then-forthcoming $890 million general obligation bond sale.

Technically I guess this is legal. It is a very subtle infringement on the Second Amendment and would be very difficult to prove in court. It is also not a new approach. During the Obama administration, the administration put in place guidelines that prevented gun dealers from getting business loans from banks.

On May 19, 2014, The New American reported:

Following the Obama administration’s “Operation Broken Trust,” an operation that began just months into his first term, the Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force was created initially to “root out and expose” investment scams. After bringing 343 criminal and 189 civil cases, the task force began looking for other targets.

The task force is a gigantic interagency behemoth, involving not only the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the FBI, but also the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the U.S. Postal Service, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), and the U.S. Secret Service.

The next target for the task force was credit card payment processors, such as PayPal, along with porn shops and drug paraphernalia stores. In 2011, it expanded its list of “high risk” businesses to include gun shops. Peter Weinstock, an attorney with Hunton & Williams, explained:

This administration has very clearly told the banking industry which customers they feel represent “reputational risk” to do business with….

Any companies that engage in any margin of risk as defined by this administration are being dropped.

In 2012, Bank of America terminated its 12-year relationship with McMillan Group International, a gun manufacturer in Phoenix, and American Spirit Arms in Scottsdale. Said Joe Sirochman, owner of American Spirit Arms:

At first, it was the bigger guys — gun parts manufacturers or high-profile retailers. Now the smaller mom-and-pop shops are being choked out….

They need their cash [and credit lines] to buy inventory. Freezing their assets will put them out of business.

That’s the whole point, according to Kelly McMillan:

This is an attempt by the federal government to keep people from buying guns and a way for them to combat the Second Amendment rights we have. It’s a covert way for them to control our right to manufacture guns and individuals to buy guns.

With the Obama administration unable to foist its gun control agenda onto American citizens frontally, this is a backdoor approach that threatens the very oxygen these businesses need to breathe. Richard Riese, a senior VP at the American Bankers Association, expanded on the attack through the banks’ back doors:

We’re being threatened with a regulatory regime that attempts to foist on us the obligation to monitor all types of transactions.

All of this is predicated on the notion that the banks are a choke point for all businesses.

How you vote matters.