Was This Really The Most Qualified Person?

On Thursday, American Greatness posted an article about the Biden administration’s pick for deputy assistant secretary of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the Energy Department’s Office of Nuclear Energy. The choice is Sam Brinton, who according to his profile on an LGBTQ website, has “a dual Master’s degree in engineering systems and nuclear science and engineering from MIT.” That’s nice. He is intellectually qualified. However, there are some things that make me question the choice.

The article reports:

In his spare time, Brinton also enjoys roleplaying as a “pup handler,” and talking about having sex with animals.

As of December 2016, having sex with animals is illegal in 42 states.

The article continues:

His drag queen alter ego is “Sister Ray Dee O’Active,” The National Pulse reported. Brinton is reportedly the son of Southern Baptist missionaries, and claims to be a “survivor of a traumatic and torturous conversion therapy experience.”

Brinton provided a biographical statement to the LGBTQ Religious Archives network that included a story about how he had helped a little boy embrace his inner “princess” at Disneyland when the child saw him sashaying around in stiletto heels with his boyfriend.

This man obviously has some serious psychological issues. There is no way he should be holding an important position in our government.

Bowing To Reality

On Sunday, The Epoch Times posted an article that might indicate that Europe is waking up the pitfalls of ‘green energy.’

The article reports:

The European Union has drafted a proposal that allows consideration for natural gas and nuclear energy to be included within the scope of “green” investments as countries and environmentalists battle over the complicated classification system.

Later this month, the European Commission is expected to suggest recommendations on the environmental criteria needed in order to classify an energy source as “green” and whether projects can be included within the EU’s “sustainable finance taxonomy.” According to draft conclusions viewed by multiple media outlets, the commission has suggested adding gas and nuclear energy to the green mix, resulting in immediate criticism from some governing political parties and environmental activists.

Gas projects would be temporarily labeled green if they were utilized in place of coal and emitted less than 270 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (e/kWh), receive a construction permit before the end of 2030, and plan to switch to a renewable energy source by 2035.

There are a lot of problems with ‘green energy.’ Although solar energy and wind energy seem like a wonderful idea, the chemicals that go into making solar panels and the problem of disposing of wind turbine blades after they are no longer useful need to be considered. Natural gas is extremely clean burning and abundant. Nuclear energy with good safety measures is also reliable and safe. At some point we are going to have to admit that green energy alone will not provide the power needed to run our civilization.

The article concludes:

“Taking account of scientific advice and current technological progress as well as varying transition challenges across member states, the Commission considers there is a role for natural gas and nuclear as a means to facilitate the transition toward a predominantly renewable-based future,” the European Commission said in a Jan. 1 statement.

EU advisers have contended that gas projects shouldn’t be given green labels unless the amount of emitted carbon dioxide is less than 100 grams per e/kWh, failing which there could be disastrous consequences for the climate. Nuclear power, likewise, can have adverse effects on the environment, especially when it comes to the disposal of radioactive waste.

“By including them … the commission risks jeopardizing the credibility of the EU’s role as a leading marketplace for sustainable finance,” European Greens President Philippe Lamberts said, Reuters reported.

Several European countries that operate nuclear plants, such as France, want the bloc to consider the nuclear option to be included in the so-called taxonomy to make it eligible for green financing.

In September 2014, I posted an article detailing what happened when Spain decided to  convert to green energy. What happened in Spain should have been enough to encourage the EU to include natural gas and nuclear energy in their future energy plans.