Who’s Next

In the current news cycle, the difference between a conspiracy theory and actual news is about six weeks. Remember when President Trump commented that if ‘the woke people’ kept on tearing down statues they would eventually get to Thomas Jefferson. Well, they did.

Breitbart reported the following yesterday:

“Trump has posited that the statues of Founding Fathers could come down following the removal of Confederate symbols across the country. Historians say he’s wrong,” wrote the far-left liars at NBC News in 2017.

…“Art handlers packed up an 884-pound statue of Jefferson in a wooden crate Monday,” reports the New York Post, “after a mayoral commission voted to banish the likeness of the nation’s third president from City Hall where its resided for nearly two centuries — because he owned slaves.”

The article concludes:

It’s not Thomas Jefferson owning slaves that offends the left. All kinds of people owned slaves in those days, including many of the oh-so-precious and noble “indigenous peoples” of North America we’re supposed to gush over. What offends the left is Thomas Jefferson’s ideas.

He was a man who stood for the very thing that most threatens the fascist left, and that’s individual liberty—the right of each of us to live, speak, act, behave, believe, and worship in whatever way we choose.

That’s what the left despises about Jefferson and the Founding Fathers. That’s why they want him disappeared, removed, blacklisted and forgotten.

Erasing history accomplishes nothing. We can’t change what was culturally acceptable hundreds of years ago. I wonder how Americans in future generations will look at abortion. I wonder if they will realize how many minority babies were murdered versus the number of white babies. We are not in a moral position to criticize slavery. Many of the government programs we have instituted are no less immoral.

Mr. Mayor, You Will Be Missed

Today’s New York Times is reporting that Edward Koch, the former mayor of New York City died this morning. Ed Koch was 88 years old.

The article highlights his career:

Most important, he is credited with leading the city government back from near bankruptcy in the 1970s to prosperity in the 1980s. He also began one of the city’s most ambitious housing programs, which continued after he left office and eventually built or rehabilitated more than 200,000 housing units, revitalizing once-forlorn neighborhoods.

Politically, Mr. Koch’s move to the right of center was seen as a betrayal by some old liberal friends, but it gained him the middle class and three terms in City Hall. He was also the harbinger of a transformation in the way mayors are elected in New York, with candidates relying less on the old coalition of labor unions, minority leaders and Democratic clubhouses and more on heavy campaign spending and television to make direct appeals to a more independent-minded electorate.

Mayor Koch had a flamboyancy that made it seem as if he were designed for the job of Mayor of New York City. He spoke his mind whether he agreed with his political party or not. He fit the classic definition of a liberal, but yet trimmed the budget of New York City during his term.

Mayor Koch was always a man who was a joy to watch, whether you agreed with him or not. He will be sorely missed. He was a man who voiced his opinion whether it was politically correct or not.Enhanced by Zemanta