How To Twist A Story To Fit Your Agenda

The mainstream media is trashing Indiana‘s new law that protects the religious rights of Christians. We can’t have those rights protected, we have to have other rights protected. One of the stories that has repeatedly shown up on Facebook is the story of a pizza place that won’t serve gays. It seems a little odd that a pizza place would even know if a customer was gay, but the story is definitely making the rounds. Well, as usual, the truth is not necessarily what has been posted.

Yesterday The Daily Caller posted an article about the pizza place in question. I hope they sue the reporter who wrote the story for serious money–they were slandered.

The article reports:

There were no complaints nor denials of service to anyone ever, but because of their religious beliefs, Memories Pizza stands in ruin and the family who owns it has had their lives threatened countless times. How did the O’Connor family, owners of Memories, find themselves in this situation? They were honest with a reporter in search of a story to fit the media’s narrative.

Alyssa Marino is a reporter with ABC 57 News in South Bend, Indiana. With her state in the center of a hurricane over religious freedom, Marino must’ve thought she’d had a coup – a devout Christian business owner willing to speak on camera about their religious beliefs and how it impacts the operations of that business.

…When owner Crystal O’Connor told Marino, “If a gay couple came in and wanted us to provide pizzas for their wedding, we would have to say no,” she had to know she’d struck gold.

Marino had her headline, “RFRA: Michiana business wouldn’t cater a gay wedding.” O’Connor’s quote was in paragraph three. The chyron on the screen for the report read, “Restaurant denies some services to same-sex couples.”

And that is how you twist a story to smear someone who holds a belief different than the one you are promoting.

What In The World Are We Putting On Television?

I know that my cable company has channels that I won’t watch. I understand that movies I think should be rated “R” are often rated “PG-13.” I understand that basically I don’t think nudity or sex belongs on my television or my computer. I think that makes me something of a dinosaur. However, it was not quite as bad when it was somewhere in the triple-digit channels that I don’t even flip through. Now it is coming to a FOX station in the regular line-up.

CNS News reported today:

Beginning Saturday, the FOX network will air a number of animated shows that contain sexually explicit and profanity-laced content never before shown on network television during its “Animation Domination High-Def” (ADHD) programming block.

The article reports that originally the explicit material will be shown at 10 o’clock at night when ideally children will not be watching it. There are two problems with that idea–the shows could be DVR‘d by anyone over the age of five, and the network is breaking ground with the intention of moving the shows into prime time after they have been on for a while.
This is not good for our children and it is not good for our society. Television already teaches children bad manners and inappropriate ways to treat people, why do we have to add bad language and sex?

The article reports:

In an interview with CNSNews, Dan Isett, director of public policy for the Parents Television Council (PTC), said that the programming contained some “adult-oriented material, certainly raunchy and inappropriate for an awful lot of audiences and frankly beyond the pale. It’s not really material that we’ve really seen produced by a mainstream media company before.”

If you care about your children, you need to care about what they are exposed to on television. None of this is conducive to building future citizens of a healthy society. The only way these shows will go away is if no one watches them.

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Hollywood Gets Rewarded For Its Support Of President Obama

Money talks. I hate to be cynical, but money talks. Breitbart.com reported yesterday that the production tax incentives favorable to the domestic entertainment industry enacted by Congress in 2004, extended in 2008 and scheduled to expire in 2011, have been extended through 2013. The bill passed to avoid the fiscal cliff increases taxes on 77 percent of Americans, but Hollywood gets a tax break.

The article reports:

The original tax incentive applied to productions costing less than $15 million to make ($20 million in low-income areas). The 2008 extension applies to all films, up to a deduction of $15 million (or $20 million in low-income areas). The incentive is especially generous to television series; it applies to each TV episode.

Hollywood players routinely beg the government to raise their taxes so they can pay their “fair share.” 

Yet the industry moves new productions to places where existing tax breaks help its bottom line. That means plenty of shows and films are shot in states like New Mexico, which feature highly favorable tax rates, as well as destinations north of the border with similar perks.

It really is time to find some honest legislators to redo the tax code. I believe that there are a few men of principle in our government; unfortunately there are too few of them to accomplish what needs to be done.

Every American’s Favorite Sheriff Has Died

TMZ.com is reporting that Andy Griffith has died at the age of 86.

The article reports:

Griffith, who became famous for “The Andy Griffith Show,” passed away at his home in Manteo, North Carolina this morning.

He was part of an era of television that has never been duplicated. His movie career included the movie “No Time For Sergeants” which is still as funny today as it was made in 1958.

Andy Griffith will be missed.

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Some Common Sense On The Campaign Trail

 

Me wit elmo

Image via Wikipedia

The New York Daily News reported today that Mitt Romney has stated that if he is elected President, Big Bird is going to have to do his own commercials.

The article reports:

Romney said he’s a fan of the Public Broadcasting Service, the government-funded nonprofit that carries “Sesame Street,” but that “it’s immoral for us to keep spending money we don’t have and passing on to our kids our obligations.”

He added that he would maintain endowments for the arts and humanities, “but they’re going to be paid for by private charity not by taxpayers — or by borrowers.”

“Sesame Street” currently has a constellation of public and private sponsors. Corporate sponsors of the program include Beaches Family Resorts, Earth’s Best organic foods, PNC, United Healthcare and the Good Egg Project, according to the website of Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization that produces “Sesame Street.” Taxpayer support for the program comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the U.S. Department of Education, among others.

This is not an endorsement of Mitt Romney. It is, however, an illustration of the difference in thinking between a businessman and a politician. I bought two of my granddaughters counting Ernie’s for Christmas. Someone made a profit on them. Someone made a huge profit on tickle-me-Elmo a few years ago. Why can’t those profits support Sesame Street and other PBS programming? Why shouldn’t the Public Broadcasting Service have to find a way to make its programming profitable?

 

 

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