When You Decide To Move To Another Country, You Need To Respect That Country Or Leave

We live in a world where people can often vote with their feet. They can decide if they want to remain in their country of origin or immigrate to another country. Hopefully they do whatever they do legally, but generally that can be an option. When a person decides to immigrate to another country, they would do well to learn the customs of that country and respect them. Otherwise, why would they remain there? Unfortunately, there are some people who have come to America with the idea of changing America to resemble the country they just left. In that case, please go home. It will be easier for everyone in the long run.

TopRightNews posted an article today that illustrates a problem with some of the people who have chosen to come to America.

The article reports:

The Muslim Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has decided that Memorial Day should not honor those American soldiers who have died, instead, it should honor those Muslim terrorists who were killed by American soldiers.

You read that right. As nearly all Americans come together on Memorial Day to honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the country’s freedom and safety, two CAIR officials spent the holiday weekend differently: questioning whether U.S. troops deserve to be honored and tweeting that the country was “established upon white supremacy.”

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a group labeled by the Justice Department as a U.S. Muslim Brotherhood entity and “un-indicted co-conspirator” in a terrorism-financing trial, disingenuously claims that it is a moderate organization.

Yet, on May 23, Zahra Billoo, the radical executive-director of CAIR’s San Francisco Bay Area chapter, tweeted that she “struggles with Memorial Day each year” about whether to honor American soldiers who died in wars.

If you do not like the way things are done in America, please feel free to go someplace that is more to your liking.

Icebergs On Lake Superior

CBS Local in Minnesota posted a picture on Saturday of icebergs on Lake Superior. This is the picture.

(credit: Wis. DNR)

The article further reports:

According to a National Geographic report, the summer temperatures of the Great Lakes are expected to be colder this year because more than 90 percent of the lakes had been covered in ice during this past winter.

Global warming, anyone?

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Memorial Day

This post was written by a friend of mine who is retired from the Marine Corps. She is an Iraqi war veteran, and I wanted to share her thoughts on Memorial Day.

 

Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State in the 1850s, said “If the country is worth dying for in a time of war, let us ensure that it is worth living for in a time of peace.”

 
I grew up in an affluent neighborhood in the Bay Area in California–the type of place where people speak of being proud to be Americans, but only because it is a place where they are allowed to live their accustomed lifestyle. But then again, it was also in the 1980s, a time of peace and prosperity when it was easy to say you love this place. Time had healed the bitter sentiments surrounding Vietnam, and we could all be happy dancing in a ring around the sun, so to speak.

 
I have now seen life further from the Utopian suburbia of my youth than just about anyone there cares to know. The reality, now, is that we are not a country experiencing peace and prosperity. But that shouldn’t make us any less proud.

 
I am back in my childhood home this weekend, and it got me thinking about what Memorial Day is. I was here to attend my sister’s Bridal Shower–a gathering of women, most of whom I have known from childhood. As the token neighborhood veteran, I always get quite a few “thank you for your service” niceties.
While the sentiments are always appreciated, I am not ultimately the one who should be thanked. It’s the one who didn’t come home–the one who never got to hear a “thank you for your service.” The one who never got to see a yellow ribbon tied around a tree. They found this country worth dying for, so, in their honor make this country worth living for.

 
We are engaged in what has been called “The Long War.” It may be a long time before we can agree to call our country “at peace.” So make it worth living for now. Honor those who have giving all by living and drinking in the freedoms of this land. Go exercise your right to freedom of speech and religious practice. Be proud of what makes you unique. Speak for the war, against the war, be gay or straight, worship your god. And do in a way worth living — because thanks to those who have died, you can do it freely. Drink this freedom in. And through living life, we can make this country feel at peace.

 
As for me, right now I’m going for a run. Because that is what my dear friend the late Maj Megan McClung would want to do today.

 
Happy Memorial Day, God Bless all who have gone, and all who are yet to come.

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Found On Facebook

Patriot Graves

Of all the dangers facing our country, perhaps the greatest danger of all is the one that still doesn’t make many headlines — our collective national amnesia. Our history textbooks are sanitized to be politically correct and give our children little sense of the greatness of the nation they live in. The Founders are seldom mentioned unless it is part of a controversy about slavery or some other scandal.

I am often struck by how often decent American kids have nothing good to say about their own country. Their knowledge of the sacrifices made to establish and preserve their freedom is virtually non-existent. They are the recipients of the greatest freedom and opportunity that any society has ever produced, yet they are unaware of the price in flesh and blood that was paid for it.

At my father’s table, I learned love of country in a way that only a Marine could teach it. Dad taught me that patriotism wasn’t a theory — it was flesh and blood, real sacrifice and pain. You are your children’s most important teacher. They are listening.

This weekend, as we celebrate Memorial Day, tell your children about the sacrifices that had to be made to stop the march of fascism and the cancer of communism. Tell them about the beaches of Normandy and the Bataan Death March. Tell them about why there was a Berlin Wall and how free men brought it down.

Remind them about 9/11, what happened at the Pentagon and over the fields of Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Take just a minute in the next three days to teach them to love the things we love and honor the things we honor.

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A Guest Post From A Local Pastor

 
“No greater love has no one than this, that one lay down His life for His friends.” 
                                                                                                            Jesus Christ (John 15:13)
 
            Since our revolution many American men and women have sacrificed their lives for the sake of the freedom of this country.  As Thomas Paine wrote in The Crisis, “These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; and he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.”  Memorial day is a great opportunity to reflect upon those who have given their lives for the sake of our country and give thanks to God for their sacrifice that has maintained our freedoms.  May their death that they died for you not be in vain. 
            But perhaps a greater Memorial Day ought to be celebrated every day in recognizing the death of Jesus Christ who died on behalf of those whom He loved.  This death He died in order to purchase freedom from sin for all who would place their trust in Him.  He didn’t die for country; He didn’t die for friends.  He died for those who were actively His enemies.  He prayed for those who nailed Him to the cross.  He willingly gave Himself up.  He said that no one took His life away but He willingly gave it so that He might bear your sin and liberate you from its bondage.  If you have never celebrated Memorial Day in this way, take a moment to call upon the name of the Lord and ask God to give you the gift of eternal life through the death of His Son Jesus Christ and then praise God for the new found liberty and freedom that is yours through the gift He paid for by His death.  May the death He died for you not be in vain. 
 
Dave Meunier, Pastor, Plainville Baptist Church, Plainville, MA
(John 4:34)
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