An Interesting Twist On The Game Of Baseball

Fox Business reported yesterday that Major Leage Baseball has announced that the New York Yankees will plan the Chicago White Sox at the “Field of Dreams” stadium located in the cornfields of Dyersville, Iowa. The temporary stadium seats 8,000. This will be the first ever Major League Baseball game played there.

The article reports:

“As a sport that is proud of its history linking generations, Major League Baseball is excited to bring a regular-season game to the site of Field of Dreams,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said. “We look forward to celebrating the movie’s enduring message of how baseball brings people together at this special cornfield in Iowa.”

This won’t be the first time that Major League Baseball has built a temporary stadium for just one game. Iin 2016, a 12,500-seat stadium was erected at Fort Bragg in North Carolina to give military members and their families a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

What a great idea!

 

 

This Is Ridiculous

WCVB Channel 5 in Boston is reporting that Boston has approved a plan to change the name of Yawkey Way, the street outside Fenway Park named in honor of a former Red Sox owner some have said was racist. Tom Yawkey owned the Boston Red Sox for 43 years, from 1933 to 1976. The Red Sox were the last baseball team to hire an African-American player, and Tom Yawkey is supposed to have screamed out racial slurs at black players at a tryout. In 1977 Jersey Street was renamed Yawkey Way.

Channel 5 reports:

Yawkey’s supporters opposed the change, saying the foundation named for him has provided millions of dollars in charitable contributions that have benefited all city residents.

“As we have said throughout this process, the effort to expunge Tom Yawkey’s name has been based on a false narrative about his life and his historic 43-year ownership of the Red Sox. The drastic step of renaming the street, now officially sanctioned by the City of Boston (and contradicting the honor the City bestowed upon Tom Yawkey over 40 years ago), will unfortunately give lasting credence to that narrative and unfairly tarnish his name, despite his unparalleled record of transforming the Red Sox and Fenway Park and supporting the city he loved through his philanthropy,” the statement read.

I have no idea whether or not Tom Yawkey was a racist, but that was then and this is now. Mr. Yawkey has done a lot of good things for the city of Boston, and it is ridiculous to rename a street named after him because of non-proven accusations of inappropriate actions which unfortunately were reflective of the time and community he was part of. We need to remember that there was a time in our country when racism was acceptable. Thank goodness, it is no longer acceptable although it does still exist. Isn’t it time to move forward rather than to hold on to old misdeeds?

We Will All Miss Yogi Berra

Yogi Berra was a major part of an era when baseball was a wonderful sport and most of its players were positive role models. My husband talks about the days when Whitey Ford used to play basketball with the neighborhood children at the local elementary school. Those were the days.

Everyone who remembers those days is saddened by the news that Yogi Berra has died at the age of 90.

Newsmax has posted fifty-three Yogi Berra quotes. Here are a few of them:

  • “I never said most of the things I said.”
  • “It ain’t over till it’s over.”
  • Mickey Mantle was a very good golfer, but we weren’t allowed to play golf during the season; only at spring training.”
  • “If the people don’t want to come out to the ballpark, nobody’s going to stop them.”
  • “Baseball is 90 percent mental. The other half is physical.”
  • “I can see how he (Sandy Koufax) won 25 games. What I don’t understand is how he lost five.”
  • “In baseball, you don’t know nothing.”
  • “I never blame myself when I’m not hitting. I just blame the bat and if it keeps up, I change bats. After all, if I know it isn’t my fault that I’m not hitting, how can I get mad at myself?”
  • “I think Little League is wonderful. It keeps the kids out of the house.”
  • “I wish everybody had the drive he (Joe DiMaggio) had. He never did anything wrong on the field. I’d never seen him dive for a ball, everything was a chest-high catch, and he never walked off the field.”
  • “It’s deja vu all over again.”
  • “I usually take a two-hour nap from 1 to 4.”
  • “Never answer an anonymous letter.”
  • “We made too many wrong mistakes.”
  • “You can observe a lot by watching.”
  • “The future ain’t what it used to be.”
  • “If you don’t know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else.”
  • “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going, because you might not get there.”
  • “It gets late early out here.”

Other articles about Yogi Berra note that he won 10 World Series as a player and three more as a coach. Today’s New York Post quoted the players that knew him and their comments.

Here are two of the quotes from The New York Post:

Derek Jeter

“To those who didn’t know Yogi personally, he was one of the greatest baseball players and Yankees of all time. To those lucky ones who did, he was an even better person. To me he was a dear friend and mentor. He will always be remembered for his success on the field, but I believe his finest quality was how he treated everyone with sincerity and kindness. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends.

Hal Steinbrenner, Yankees general partner

“Yogi Berra’s legacy transcends baseball. Though slight in stature, he was a giant in the most significant of ways through his service to his country, compassion for others and genuine enthusiasm for the game he loved. He has always been a role model and hero that America could look up to.

“While his baseball wit and wisdom brought out the best in generations of Yankees, his imprint in society stretches far beyond the walls of Yankee Stadium. He simply had a way of reaching and relating to people that was unmatched. That’s what made him such a national treasure.

“On behalf of my family and the entire Yankees organization, we extend our deepest condolences to Yogi’s family, friends and loved ones.”

Yogi Berra’s quotes and observations on life will be missed.

 

Do We Actually Have A Southern Border?

On Saturday, the Washington Times posted a story about the latest Congressional oversight report on the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This was Senator Tom Coburn‘s final oversight report. CBN News also reported a similar story today.

The article in the Washington Times points out a few highlights in the report:

Less than 3 percent of illegal immigrants will ever be deported, and more than 700 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border remained unsecured as of 2014.

…The report also said corruption is a serious problem in the Border Patrol, but said agency officials actually told internal affairs investigators to cut down on the number of cases they were pursuing, according to the former division head.

In another finding Mr. Coburn’s staff on the Senate Homeland Security Committee found mission creep to be a problem: agents at one immigration agency spent time cracking down on women’s lingerie that they believed infringed on Major League Baseball’s officially licensed logos. The agents raided a lingerie store in Kansas City, Mo., flashed their badges and confiscated 18 pairs of underwear marked with an unauthorized Kansas City Royals logo, Mr. Coburn’s investigators found.

The article at CBN News reported:

“Ten years of oversight of the Department of Homeland Security finds that the Department still has a lot of work to do to strengthen our nation’s security,” Coburn explained. 

“Congress needs to review the Department’s mission and programs and refocus DHS on national priorities where DHS has a lead responsibility,” he added.

Coburn also says 700 miles of the southern border is still unsecured.

The agency also has problems protecting itself from online attacks, even though it’s supposed to protect the country from them.

Needless to say, the DHS had a different take on the oversight report (as reported in the Washington Times):

Homeland Security Department spokeswoman Marsha Catron thanked Mr. Coburn for his report, but said it didn’t capture the extent of the work her department does.

Dr. Coburn’s report on DHS overlooks much of the concrete and recent progress we have made over the past year to improve homeland security and the manner in which DHS conducts business,” she said.

You will have to excuse my skepticism. I think it’s time to reevaluate the mission and success of the DHS and consider more effective ways to guard America’s security.