Some Relevant Thoughts On Voter Fraud

On Friday, Investor’s Business Daily posted an editorial titled, “Why Do Democrats Pretend Voter Fraud Doesn’t Exist?”

The editorial begins by providing examples showing that voter fraud does exist:

In August, the Justice Department announced the prosecution of 19 foreign nationals for illegally voting in North Carolina. Some of them voted in multiple elections.

Texas State Attorney General Ken Paxton decided to crack down on voter fraud before the midterm elections. So far, he’s prosecuted 33 people for 97 counts of voter fraud this year alone. Among the discoveries was a voter fraud ring that had received financial support from the former head of the Texas Democratic Party.

Pennsylvania let thousands of noncitizens register to vote, many of whom have since voted, according to reporter John Fund, who has been following this issue for years.

The Heritage Foundation has a database that now includes 1,165 cases of election fraud across 47 states. More than 1,000 of them resulted in criminal convictions.

One case of voter fraud is too many. Any fraudulent vote cancels out the vote of a legal voter. This is an issue all of us should be concerned about. One of the foundations of a healthy republic is honest elections. Without honest elections, we could easily become a banana republic.

The editorial concludes:

The fact is that committing voter fraud isn’t all that difficult, but minimizing it is easy. Cleaning up registration rolls, enacting voter ID requirements, using paper ballots, and implementing better controls on early and absentee voting would make non-citizen voting and other forms of fraud virtually impossible.

Critics of such efforts say that they will only serve to suppress the vote of minorities and the poor — that is, voters who tend to vote Democratic. They want to make it easier and easier to register and vote.

But there’s no evidence that voter ID laws suppress turnout. In fact, of 11 states that adopted strict voter ID laws, nine either saw increased turnout in 2016, or had turnout rates higher than the national average, the Heritage Foundation notes.

Nor does cleaning up registration rolls, aggressively pursuing voter fraud cases, using paper ballots, or other measures to ensure the integrity of the ballot suppress legitimate voters.

Those who say voter fraud is no big deal should realize something. Every single vote cast fraudulently cancels out one legitimate vote. They need to ask themselves how they’d feel if it was their vote being canceled.

It is long past time to fix this.

Does Voter Fraud Exist?

The following information is from the Voter Integrity Project Website:

The Voter Integrity Project of NC was founded in 2011 by Jay DeLancy and John Pizzo.  Their mission was to ensure free and fair elections to all lawfully registered voters. Mr. Pizzo has more than 30 years private industry experience in the discipline of of quality engineering and holds a Six Sigma Black Belt. Mr. DeLancy is a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, with military experience in both conventional and nuclear operations with advanced degree work in journalism, business and political communication. His past teaching assignments include numerous community colleges, Park University, Bluefield College, Liberty University, NC State University and a temporary position at Duke.

The VIP plan was simple: Mine public data, analyze that data and let the evidence speak for itself. They fashioned themselves as a “non-partisan” organization, because election laws (like the Constitution itself) should transcend political and cultural boundaries. Open and honest elections are in our nation’s best interest.

Starting with a “voter density” study of North Carolina’s 100 counties, they began publishing their research results on-line and sharing it with media, lawmakers and with peers from other states.

Their second project copied the ground-breaking work of the Miami Herald, who obtained the names and addresses of persons disqualified from jury duty because of their non-US citizen status. This VIP effort led to the discovery of 130 people who had voted before they were disqualified from jury duty, 11 of whom became targets of criminal referrals. This research has led to legislative attempts in 2013, 2015 and 2017 to require Clerks of Court to share their data with elections officials.

Their third project, garnering national exposure, led to the discovery of almost 30,000 deceased persons who were still registered to vote, some of whom had voting records beyond their date of death. This research identified numerous “data leakage” points in the deceased-voter removal process. It also triggered consultations with election officials that resulted in process improvements for identification and removal of deceased-voters’ records.

The fourth major project involved detecting persons who voted in more than one state during the same Federal election. By matching 11 million Florida voters with the 77 million NC voters, VIP ultimately reported more than 150 voters who were highly likely to have committed this felony. Investigations are ongoing, but the work triggered five initial criminal referrals. As of January 2018, this project has spawned three felony convictions (for details, please click here and here) and numerous consultations with senior election officials in other states. This project (called “FLANC,” as in Florida and NC) also resulted in the first VIP publication that is being sold to the public through Amazon’s marketplace.

Other major research projects are currently underway that all point to identifying areas of election law that need process improvement and prevention strategies for abuses and illegal voting activities such as voter impersonation and intimidation.

A website called Secure the Vote NC has been set up to shed light on voting irregularities in North Carolina in past elections (and hopefully prevent voting irregularities in future elections).

Some basic facts about voting in North Carolina:

1. Thirty-four states have voter ID laws. North Carolina is not one of them.

2. Of the twelve Southeastern states, North Carolina is the only one that does not have voter ID laws.

3. In 2012, the Voter Integrity Project reported close to 30,000 deceased North Carolina voters to the North Carolina State Board of Elections.

4. In 2016, 498 North Carolina voters showed up to vote and were told, “You already voted.”

An illegal vote cancels out the vote of a legal voter. If you want your vote to count, you need to support voter ID laws that ensure that you are who you say you are. We also need to support laws that allow a comparison between the voter rolls and those who refused jury duty by claiming not to be American citizens. It is time to clean up our voting system.

Something That Needs To Be Fixed Before November

I think I am right in saying that most Americans want an honest election in November–regardless of who wins. Florida has taken steps to make sure that at least they get it right.

On Wednesday, PJ Media reported that Florida had discovered up to 53,000 dead voters who are listed on the state’s voter rolls. Obviously they have purged the voters from the list.

In this day when supermarkets track your every purchase and your cell phone reports your location, how is it that states can’t keep track of who is no longer eligible to vote? It’s simple–Florida (and most other states) were using a database that was not adequate to purge dead voters from voter rolls. Florida is now using the Social Security database, which should be more accurate.

The article concludes:

Consider the case of Lafayette Keaton.  Keaton not only voted for a dead person in Oregon, he voted for his dead son.  Making Keaton’s fraud easier was Oregon’s vote by mail scheme, which has opened up gaping holes in the integrity of elections.  The incident in Oregon just scratches the surface of the problem.  Massachusetts and Mississippi are but two other examples of the dead rising on election day.

Florida should be applauded for taking the problem seriously, even if Eric Holder’s Justice Department and many state election officials don’t.

If we are to remain a representative republic, we need honest elections.

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