Kudos To Texas A & M

Yesterday Bleacher Report posted a story about Texas A&M and Cedric Collins. Cedric Collins is a high school football cornerback who committed to Texas A&M in August 2012, just before the start of his junior year at Skyline High School in Dallas.

After the playoffs in 2012, Cedric Collins suffered numbness in his legs, and the doctors discovered that he had a rare congenital cervical abnormality. Cedric Collins would never be able to play football again. Texas A&M had a decision to make.

The article reports:

However, even though Collins will never suit up for the Aggies in College Station, the school has decided to honor his scholarship, according to Kate Hairopoulos of The Dallas Morning News.

The head coach at Texas A7M sent out the following tweet:

tweetfromcoachThe article further reports:

Collins, who was a 3-star prospect, according to 247Sports, will work as a student coach at Texas A&M, hoping to eventually get into coaching as a long-term endeavor.

He will still be part of the program and might still have a future in football, despite not being able to take the field. And Texas A&M did this despite not being forced to, dispelling the notion that all college programs are heartless, soulless guilds that only care about young men who can help them win football games. 

That is a very cool thing.

It is a credit to Texas A&M that they have made a commitment to this young man’s future regardless of the fact that he won’t be playing football for them.

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In The World Of The Internet, A Candidate Needs To Get Their Biography Straight

Today’s Houston Chronicle posted a story about Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis. Ms. Davis seems to have forgotten some of the details of her life story. The problem with that is that in the age of the internet fact-checking is very easy for anyone who takes the time to do it.

When she did her filibuster for abortion, Ms. Davis claimed to have been a struggling divorced teenage mother poverty-stricken and living in a trailer. Actually, she was 21 when she divorced and lived in a trailer only for a few months. She remarried and her husband paid for her education. Curiously enough, they were divorced shortly after the final bill for her law degree was paid.

The article reports:

“My language should be tighter,” she told the Morning News. “I’m learning about using broader, looser language. I need to be more focused on the detail.”

In a statement released to the media Monday, Davis said that “the truth is that at age 19, I was a teenage mother living alone with my daughter in a trailer and struggling to keep us afloat on my way to a divorce.” She also clarified that she didn’t officially file for divorce until age 20 and that it wasn’t finalized until the following year.

Does it matter? I am sure no one cares exactly how old she was when she got her first divorce or about the details of her personal life, but were the facts altered in order to create a specific image? I understand that politics is about image and that the truth is often stretched. However, this is not simply a stretch–this is misleading.

In the end, the voters will make the decision, and since Texas is historically a red state, even without this deception exposed, Ms. Davis is not the favored candidate. But hopefully, her experience should remind candidates that it pays to get the facts right–especially about your own biography.

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The Next Birther Controversy

Ed Morrissey at Hot Air posted a story today about the next birther controversy–it’s not Barack Obama–it’s Ted Cruz. Ted Cruz has released his birth certificate to the Dallas Morning News. Senator Cruz was born in Canada to an American mother and a father who fled Castro’s Cuba. Under American law, Cruz became an American citizen at birth because his mother was an American. Under Canadian law, Cruz is a Canadian citizen because he was born in Canada.

The article reports:

The presidential requirement of being a “natural born citizen” in Article 2, Section 1 of the US Constitution is unique, in that the concept has pretty much no other application in American life.  However, it’s not so unique as to be completely without analogy or comprehension.  A natural-born citizen can be defined as an American that does not require extra intervention to access citizenship rights.  If Cruz had to go through the naturalization process to vote, for instance, or to get a US passport, then he would not qualify to run for President.  Instead, Cruz has been able to legally exercise his rights as a citizen without any other intervention except his coming of age, as all American citizens do.  Current law makes it clear that regardless of how Canada sees Cruz, the US saw him as a citizen by provenance of his birth — a natural-born citizen.

Senator Cruz’s birth certificate is actually not related to this controversy. Ed Morrissey wonders if Senator Cruz is being a little tongue-in-cheek here. Since the controversy is rather silly to begin with, he might as well have a good laugh about it.

 

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A New Political Low

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Official ...

Image via Wikipedia

I understand that presidential primaries can be nasty, but sometimes things get totally out of hand. Recent events in Texas show how our political system can be manipulated to the detriment of our national security.

CBN News is reporting today that Mohammed Elibiary, an advisor to the Department of Homeland Security, was given access to sensitive government documents. Mr. Elibiary then leaked some of those documents to the media. Supposedly, his goal was to defeat the presidential campaign of Texas Governor Rick Perry by accusing him of “Islamophobia.”

The article reports:

Out of 26 members on the Department of Homeland Security’s Advisory Council, only Elibiary was granted access to a nationwide database that includes terror watch lists and sensitive FBI reports. 

Mr. Elibiary is not an obvious candidate to be working with the Department of Homeland Security. The article reports:

In 2004, he spoke at a Texas conference honoring Iran’s notorious Ayatollah Khomeini as a “great Islamic visionary.”

He’s written in praise of one of the most influential Islamic radicals of the modern era: former Muslim Brotherhood leader Sayyid Qutb.

And he has spoken out against the prosecution of Hamas fundraisers in the U.S.

In a disturbing 2006 email exchange with a Dallas Morning News editor, Elibiary wrote: “Treat people as inferiors and you can expect someone to put a banana in your exhaust pipe or something.”

This really does not fit my definition of a ‘moderate’ Muslim. The good news here is that Mr. Elibiary’s access to the database of the Department of Homeland Security has reportedly been revoked.

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