Voter Fraud In North Carolina

A website called American Lens posted an article today about voter fraud in North Carolina.

The article cites a few glaring examples:

According to North Carolina law, The Board of Election is required to verify the validity of the applicant’s residence (§163-82.7). In most cases, there is an assumption that the residence is valid, however, a cursory check of the data in Durham County should have raised a flag of concern.

As seen in the snapshot below of our data analysis, it is clear that hundreds of people are listed at the exact same address at Duke University’s campus in Durham.

Our examination of same-day student registrations revealed that 240 students  at Duke University were living at ‘1 Duke University Road, Durham.’

We then looked at online mapping sites, such as Google Maps and Bing Maps to understand why so many people were listed at the exact same address.

The address was a gravel parking lot with a shed.

Further research results were detailed in the article:

Believing the Duke results may just be an anomaly, we looked at the data for other college campuses in both Durham and Wake counties. We found more than 700 voters were registered at a centralized campus locations and not where they sleep.

At North Carolina Central University (NCCU), 340 students were registered to the college’s generic address of 1801 Fayetteville Road, Durham, NC.

Taking into consideration the definition of residence, it would appear that all of these voters mentioned in this article did not meet the voter residency requirements and subsequently voted without a valid registration.

I think we have a problem.

Indiana Voter Fraud

Fox News reported today that two Democratic political operatives were convicted last night of fraud in the 2008 Indiana primary that put President Obama and Hillary Clinton on the ballot.

The article reports:

Former longtime St. Joseph County Democratic party Chairman Butch Morgan Jr.  was found guilty of felony conspiracy counts to commit petition fraud and forgery, and former county Board of Elections worker Dustin Blythe was found guilty of felony forgery counts and falsely making a petition, after being accused of faking petitions that enabled Obama, then an Illinois Senator, to get on the presidential primary ballot for his first run for the White House.

I am glad that the people involved in the fraud have been convicted, but I think the important thing here is to learn from the experience. President Obama and Hillary Clinton could have easily gathered the necessary signatures to be placed on the ballot–there was no reason to cheat. Our election officials need to get into the habit of routinely randomly checking signatures on petitions. If one of two signatures on a page don’t match, further investigation is needed. If five random signatures on a petition match, things should be okay.

I wonder about the integrity of our election system when we have a party leader who casually cheats when he could get the same result honestly.

Enhanced by Zemanta