Questioning The Credibility Of An Accuser

The ‘me, too’ movement has reinforced the idea that any woman who accuses a man of any sort of sexual impropriety should be automatically believed. She should be listened to, but not necessarily believed. An example of the fact that everything an accuser says is not to be believed without being critically examined has recently surfaced.

The Washington Examiner is reporting today:

One of Roy Moore‘s accusers admitted Friday that she added “notes” to Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore’s signature in her yearbook but insisted he did sign her yearbook in 1977.

Why did she add notes? A lot of people signed my yearbook back in the age of dinosaurs, is it that important that he might have signed it? How many times does a public figure routinely sign something that is randomly put in front of him?

How much of this person’s testimony is now questionable? I guess the voters of Alabama will tell us. How likely is the mainstream media to report this?

Things Are Not Always What They Seem

Yesterday, One America News posted the following video:

I am posting this video because I was very concerned about a report I heard on Fox News this morning. A commentator was talking about the recent firing of Matt Lauer. He also mentioned Roy Moore in his comments, making the assumption that Roy Moore was guilty. I would like to point out that Roy Moore has been a public figure for more than twenty years, and none of these charges have been previously reported. I would also like to note that none of the charges are less than thirty-five years old. I think a presumption of guilt in this case is not justified. The connections of some of Roy Moore’s accusers and their past activities further cast doubt on these accusations.